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By Kim Thomas, Special to the Chronicle Progress

Roberto Roman found guilty in death of Millard County Sheriff’s Deputy, Josie Greathouse Fox

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah – A jury found Roberto Roman guilty of killing Millard County Sheriff’s Deputy, Josie Greathouse Fox, Tuesday at Salt Lake City’s federal courthouse.

The eight-woman, four-man jury, deliberated about ten hours after being given the case Monday afternoon. 

Jurors found the 44-year-old Roman guilty of all eight counts.  Two involved the killing of Deputy Fox, six others involved having weapons while distributing methamphetamine.  Before the trial began, Roman pleaded guilty to three other counts regarding his being in the United States illegally.

Deputy Fox was shot and killed just east of Delta around midnight on Jan. 5, 2010.

“For seven years we have waited for justice in Utah,” U.S. Attorney for Utah, John Hubert, told the news media outside the court.  “The jury fulfilled their duty to find the truth in this case, and delivered justice today seven years after this cold-blooded killing of one of our cherished and valued law enforcement officers.”

The family of Deputy Fox didn’t want to make any comment, and had asked that the media not approach them as they left court.  They were asked if they’re happy, and they smiled and said they were.

When the verdicts were read, the family hugged each other, as well as members of the Millard County Sheriff’s Office and County Attorney’s Office, who’ve attended the trial.

“They’re just so much at peace, they feel so much better, especially that Ryan’s name has been cleared. It should never have been brought in, it was, and now it’s cleared,” Sheriff Robert Dekker said.

U.S. Attorney Huber called it a “diabolical twist” that Roman accused Ryan Greathouse of killing his sister, knowing that Greathouse had died, and couldn’t defend himself.

A large number of Roman’s family and friends attended the trial every day as well.  One of Roman’s brothers declined to comment outside of court.

Roman’s attorney, Stephen McCaughey, who also represented Roman at the 2012 state trial, in which Roman was found not guilty, said it’s hard to be tried twice for the same crime.  While the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled it’s not double jeopardy to try cases in state and federal courts, McCaughey said it doesn’t seem right.  He said there will most likely be an appeal.

“Working this case has been a great honor and a privilege,” lead prosecutor and Assistant U.S. Attorney for Utah, Trina Higgins said.  “I am so proud of the work that we did and that we were able to accomplish justice.  Justice for Josie.”

Sheriff Dekker was asked what Josie Fox’s legacy will be.  “Throughout the state Josie has been known and will continue to be known as a great deputy who had contact with our youth in such a manner and made such a difference to so many people,” he said.  “We still get that talked about today, our young people saying, ‘Josie helped me.’”

Judge David Nuffer scheduled sentencing for Roman on April 27.  He faces a possible sentence of life in prison.