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May 8, 1929 ~ October 8, 2016

Agnes Louise Skidmore Nielson, age 87, left her earthly home to return to the loving arms of her savior on October 8, 2016. We find great comfort in knowing that she is free from the pain that has challenged her for many years.

Louise Skidmore Nielson was born on May 8, l929 in Delta, Utah. The second of eleven children born to Evan Justin and Eleanor Lyman Skidmore. She always felt fortunate to have so many brothers and sisters to love, care and sew for. 

Growing up in Sutherland she made life long friends while experiencing the adventures farm life offered. She loved caring for the bummer lambs and swimming in the canal. Louise enjoyed working side by side with her grandfather and uncles in the alfalfa fields riding the derrick horse stacking hay.

Louise graduated from Delta High School and the College of Southern Utah, serving as a student body officer. She later obtained a teaching certificate and graduated from Utah State University with a BA. While home from college on break, she smiled as she tugged a certain young man's coat tail. On August 18, 1950, she became Mrs. Grant S. Nielson in the Manti LDS Temple. They counted their six children as their greatest accomplishment.

They settled in Leamington where she became a vital part of the LDS ward and community. She served in many capacities in the church. Her favorite may have been as a cub scout leader.

Grant and Louise traveled the world and lived on several ranches in the intermountain west, but they always came home to Delta.

Louise's family was always her number one priority. She was a loyal friend, an avid gardener, and a skilled seamstress. Louise taught elementary school in the west Millard area for 20 years. She had a gift of communicating with children and instilling in them a curiosity that led to life long learning. Perhaps her greatest, and most often used talent was the ability to try new things.

She had extraordinary faith in the Savior, Jesus Christ. We thank Heavenly Father for the time we have had with her and the memories we hold dear. She truly left this world a better place.

Louise is survived by a loving husband: Grant S. Nielson; sons: Karl (Kathy), John, Bryan (Kyle), Ron, and David (Lorna); and daughter: Christine (Cliff) Wilson. She enjoyed foster son: Steve Prochko; 20 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by parents; brothers: Gordon and Scott Skidmore; and sisters: Emoret Boshell and Julie Skeem; and beloved grandson: Jeff Nielson.

Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, October 12, at 11:00 am, at the Delta LDS Stake Center Chapel, 125 White Sage Ave. Viewings will be held Tuesday, 7-8 p.m., at the Nickle Mortuary; and Wednesday, 9:30-10:40 a.m, prior to the service. Burial will be in the Delta City Cemetery. Condolences may be left at www.nicklemortuary.com

 
February 13, 1956 ~ October 8, 2016

Jacquelyn "Jacquie" Hopkins Jensen, age 60, passed away Saturday, October 8, 2016, at her home in Roy, Utah. She was born on February 13, 1956, in Delta, Utah; the youngest of six girls born to Brog and Enid Keele Hopkins. After 5 girls, her father was hoping for a little boy, instead he was blessed with another beautiful girl, who her parents called Jacquelyn; but her father always liked to call her "Jac". She loved kids, and was always a first choice for babysitting in her neighborhood.

She graduated from Delta High School, where she was active in theatre , the school operas, and the Pep Club. She enjoyed music and learned to play piano. She attended BYU, and then married Phil Jensen on November 8, 1975, in the Manti LDS Temple.

They moved to Sutherland and raised four children. They later divorced. Jacquie worked at Service Drug, and later as a Job Coach in the Community Careers program. She also took excellent care of her mother. In 2003, Jacquie moved to Roy and became CNA, caring for many more elderly people. She retired in 2011.

She was an active member of the LDS Church, serving in many callings in the Relief Society and Primary.

Jacquie will be remembered for her service. She was always doing things for others. She was known for being a great cook, and enjoyed baking for her neighbors and friends. She loved working outside in her yard and flower garden. Her greatest joy was her family, especially her grandchildren. She had a wonderful sense of humor and was great at making people laugh.

Mom, we love you and will miss you. You will always be in our hearts.

Jacquelyn is survived by children: Niccole Jensen, Delta; Ryan ( Erica) Jensen, Santa Fe, NM; Kierstin (Jeremy) Petersen, Delta; and Jeff (Rachael) Jensen, Delta; 13 grandchildren; sisters: Naon Strate, Jean Ashton, Sharon Helier, and Debra Jackson. She was preceded in death by a sister: Irene Bowers.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, October 15, at 11:00 am, at the Sutherland LDS Ward Chapel, 2650 N 3000 W. Viewings will be held Friday, 7-8 p.m., at the Nickle Mortuary; and Saturday, 9:30-10:40 a.m, prior to the service. Burial will be in the Delta City Cemetery. Condolences may be left at www.nicklemortuary.com

 
February 13, 1956 ~ October 8, 2016

Jacquelyn "Jacquie" Hopkins Jensen, age 60, passed away Saturday, October 8, 2016, at her home in Roy, Utah. She was born on February 13, 1956, in Delta, Utah; the youngest of six girls born to Brog and Enid Keele Hopkins. After 5 girls, her father was hoping for a little boy, instead he was blessed with another beautiful girl, who her parents called Jacquelyn; but her father always liked to call her "Jac". She loved kids, and was always a first choice for babysitting in her neighborhood.

She graduated from Delta High School, where she was active in theatre , the school operas, and the Pep Club. She enjoyed music and learned to play piano. She attended BYU, and then married Phil Jensen on November 8, 1975, in the Manti LDS Temple.

They moved to Sutherland and raised four children. They later divorced. Jacquie worked at Service Drug, and later as a Job Coach in the Community Careers program. She also took excellent care of her mother. In 2003, Jacquie moved to Roy and became CNA, caring for many more elderly people. She retired in 2011.

She was an active member of the LDS Church, serving in many callings in the Relief Society and Primary.

Jacquie will be remembered for her service. She was always doing things for others. She was known for being a great cook, and enjoyed baking for her neighbors and friends. She loved working outside in her yard and flower garden. Her greatest joy was her family, especially her grandchildren. She had a wonderful sense of humor and was great at making people laugh.

Mom, we love you and will miss you. You will always be in our hearts.

Jacquelyn is survived by children: Niccole Jensen, Delta; Ryan ( Erica) Jensen, Santa Fe, NM; Kierstin (Jeremy) Petersen, Delta; and Jeff (Rachael) Jensen, Delta; 13 grandchildren; sisters: Naon Strate, Jean Ashton, Sharon Helier, and Debra Jackson. She was preceded in death by a sister: Irene Bowers.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, October 15, at 11:00 am, at the Sutherland LDS Ward Chapel, 2650 N 3000 W. Viewings will be held Friday, 7-8 p.m., at the Nickle Mortuary; and Saturday, 9:30-10:40 a.m, prior to the service. Burial will be in the Delta City Cemetery. Condolences may be left at www.nicklemortuary.com

Lloyd Ross Noyes

Aug. 22, 1952 ~ Oct. 8, 2016

Lloyd Ross Noyes passed away peacefully on October 8, 2016 surrounded by his sweetheart, children and grandchildren. He was born on August 22, 1952 in Morgan, UT, the 7th of 13 children born to Verle Mc and Doris Noyes. Lloyd learned the value of hard work while working most of his life on a dairy farm. Later in life he retired from his life of farming to his 40 hour a week job where he was able to meet and touch many peoples lives.

He served faithfully in many different callings in the church. His testimony and love for the gospel was known by all who associated with him. He always took the opportunity to share his love for music. There is nothing that meant more to him than his grandchildren by his side.

He is survived by his eternal companion Connie Lewis Noyes, Fillmore, UT; children, Shantelle Talbot (Justin) of Layton, UT; Travis Noyes (Ann) of Brigham City, UT; LaDawn Stuart (Jed) of Morgan, UT; Tiffany Robison (Bounmy Phommahaxay) , Fillmore, UT; Thomas Noyes (Shelby), Fillmore, UT and a second father to countless others; Papa to 15 beautiful grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, his sisters, Barbara Iverson and Eva Clark and his brother, John Noyes.

Funeral services will be held Saturday October 15, 2016 at 12:00 noon in the Fillmore 4th Ward Chapel (500 S 300 E). Viewings Friday from 6-9 p.m. and Saturday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. both at the Fillmore 4th Ward. Interment in the Fillmore City Cemetery.

Online condolence at www.rasmussenmortuary.com

May 28, 1944-Oct. 4, 2016

            Stephen of Scipio, UT age 72, passed away October  4, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah from respiratory  failure.  He was born in Salt Lake City and was the first child of William Cottam and Garda Redd Hatch. He married Deanna Frandsen December 31, 1971 later solemnized in the Manti Temple on May 26, 1973.

            He was preceded in death, and now reunited with, his daughter Heidi Hatch, and his parents, William and Garda Hatch and step mother, Ida Verlene Peterson Hatch. Stephen is survived by his loving wife, Deanna Hatch, and his children Shane (Kristen), Casey (Amie), Jason (Stephanie), Haley (Brandon), and Travis (Melissa) and also 16 grandchildren. 

                He graduated from Millard High School, Snow College, and Utah State University.  He was a cattle rancher and farmer.  He cherished his range and horses. For a profession he also was a respected real estate appraiser for 47 years. Stephen dedicated his entire life to serving in countless callings in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  In his later years, he enjoyed being an ordinance worker in the LDS Manti Temple with his sweetheart. Stephen was Christlike and genuinely loved people.  He was deeply spiritual, a gentle soul, and a great example to all. He also was full of joy, enjoyed lighthearted fun, and was a delight to be around. Stephen often said his greatest accomplishment and blessing in life was his family and his love for them runs eternally. 

            Funeral services will be held Monday, October 10 at 12:00 noon, a viewing will precede at 10:00 – 11:30 A.M.   A viewing service will be held Sunday, October 9 at 6:00 - 8:00 P.M.  Both will be held in the Scipio, UT. LDS Ward Building on 85 West 100 North. Online condolence rasmussenmortuary.com

A vehicle struck a 17-year-old Delta High School student on the morning of Friday, Sept. 30 at approximately 8 a.m.

According to Utah Highway Patrolman Alan Pedersen, the student was traveling northbound on 100 West. The cyclist failed to stop at the stop sign on Main Street.

By the time she entered the right hand travel lane, an eastbound car stopped abruptly to avoid colliding with her. A pickup truck, driven by a 16-year old student was traveling in the number one eastbound lane. The driver traveled past the first vehicle just as the cyclist was passing the stopped car in front of the pickup truck, colliding.

The 17-year-old cyclist was taken by ambulance to the Delta Community Medical Center. She was flown via LifeFlight to Primary Children’s Hospital as a precaution. According to Pedersen her injuries were not life threatening.

No charges will be filed in this incident.

After 32 years of service, Captain Forrest “Trees” Roper has decided to retire from duty. Roper began his career in law enforcement in 1984, his first position as a patrol deputy with the Millard County Sheriff’s Office. 

“My entire career has been with this office,” Roper said. Roper served as a patrol deputy for twelve years, then transferred to the Millard County Jail as a jail supervisor before being promoted to jail commander for seven years. Roper served as administrative lieutenant, before moving to his final position as Chief Deputy for the past eight years. 

“I’ve been through just about every division we have, with the exception of investigations,” Roper said. “When they started me on, a deputy took the case and followed it through. Now detectives do all that.” 

Roper said some aspects of law enforcement have changed since his beginnings. “Technology for one thing, like every other aspect of our lives, has changed drastically. We’re essentially still using the same radio system, with some modern modifications.” 

Roper also said the perception of law enforcement by the public has been changing in the past few years. 

While serving with the sheriff’s office, Roper was actively involved in the emergency preparedness of the county. 

“In 1988, the emergency preparedness and management functions had been assigned by the county commission to the sheriff’s office,” Roper said. “So I’ve been involved since then with the State of Utah, and was introduced through the state to CERT.” 

Roper was Chair of the Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC). The LEPC is a function of hazardous material management. It is a federal requirement that each community has an LEPC. 

“We, as well as most other counties and municipalities, use that forum as emergency planning for all hazards.” 

One of Roper’s most memorable experiences during his career occurred on July 28, 1988. 

Roper was halfway through his hazardous material training, when a truck wrecked approximately twenty miles south of Fillmore, and in the process, dumped twenty-five thousand pounds of extremely toxic sodium cyanide along Interstate 15. 

“We ended up shutting down the freeway and closing the airspace for a five mile radius,” Roper said. “I was out there nonstop, for about ninety-six hours. We had responders from many other counties helping us. It could’ve been a lot worse.” 

Roper credits the spill as more or less a good memory of his service--another event ingrained in his memory was the loss of Deputy Josie Greathouse Fox. 

“I’ll never forget that,” he said. 

Roper said he never initially had the great desire to enter law enforcement. “I was in between jobs, and thought it would be good benefits, and that it would be an interesting job and it has been.” 

Roper’s previous jobs have included ten years as a building contractor, pouring concrete in the Salt Lake Valley, and local agriculture. 

“I knew I’d never get rich doing this job but, overall, the people in this office and other offices, and the public have been great. There are times when you get a hug or a handshake from someone you’ve helped, and it makes it go a long ways.” 

Roper said being a sheriff’s deputy has been one of the most rewarding jobs he’s ever had. 

“Trees has been an asset to this office since the day that he started,” Sheriff Robert Dekker said, “He has one of the best work ethics of anybody I know. He’s never satisfied with mediocre, he’ll always do the best that he can.” 

Dekker says Roper shines in whatever assignment he’s been given, with examples of helping modernize the sheriff office’s communication systems and keeping EMS codes up to date. 

“He’s been a good friend and confidant. His position will be very hard to fill,” Dekker said. 

Roper’s last day with the Millard County Sheriff’s Office is Oct. 3. 

About 40 crop producers from Millard County spent last Wednesday learning how to improve the soil on their farms. 

The producers gleaned information from a pair of experts in a classroom setting at the Millard County Fair Building in Delta. Then, they boarded a school bus to visit the farms of Paul McCollaum and Chance Lyman who have used some of the practices the past two years. 

Lyman is a Delta Conservation District board member and was the main host for the event. 

He enjoys the farming lifestyle and would like to keep his children in the area as they grow up. To do that he will need to keep his operation profitable. 

“If I don’t begin to apply these (soil health) principles I’m not going to be in business to keep my children here,” Lyman said. “Following soil health principles I have found a way to reduce my negative influence on the ground. It’s challenging. Some of these things haven’t ever been used out here.” 

Four main points provided by the experts to enhance the soil of fields were to provide continuous roots, maximize biodiversity, minimize disturbance and maximize soil cover. 

Too much tilling and toying with depleted topsoil can lead to compaction that inhibits the amount of water to the plants. 

Lyman feeds his herd of cows in certain locations to distribute the manure. “It’s cost-effective if I move my cattle versus spreading manure,” he said. 

McCollaum said he has planted cover crops the past two years and has seen mixed results. 

Utah State University Extension Soils Specialist Grant Cardon told the group that soil is a living, breathing tissue. He said topsoil is more organic than sub soils. “Topsoil can take 500 plus years to develop,” Cardon said. 

He said loamy soil is the best, but soils can be amended with organic material. That process is known as tilth. 

Cardon said people could help change soils naturally. Some of the practices in the past have been good and some bad. All the factors are interrelated. 

Neils Hansen, agronomist with USU, also spoke to the group. 

“It amazes me when I come out to Delta. You guys can farm!” Hansen said. “You’re growing things on an old lakebed that has been a desert for many thousands of years. It doesn’t have much organic matter. I have to take my hat off to you because you are creating something that has never been there before.” 

Hansen said farmers should reduce tillage as much as they can. 

“We love the idea of cover crops, eight to ten types of cover crops. We love cover crops because it increases organic matter, increases water infiltration, increases earthworms,” he said. 

Lyman was pleased with the soil health workshop and field trip. 

“If producers in the area start using soil health principles now, they will see major improvement and quality in the soil the next five years,” he said. 

The Millard County company LiquaDry was found not liable in a lawsuit for the wrongful death of 51-year old Valinda Conk, after a seven-day trial.

The eight-person jury of seven women and one man was selected from a pool of one hundred people over a one-day selection, and achieved their verdict after an hour and a half deliberation on the afternoon of Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Valinda Conk was killed on February 22, 2012, after her vehicle was involved in a collision with a Ford New Holland tractor allegedly owned by LiquaDry. The tractor was being used by a minor, another defendant in the case, for a local Future Farmers of America (FFA) event on the day of the accident. The incident occurred at the intersection of Cropper Lane and Lone Tree Road (Center Street), south of Delta, at approximately four o’clock in the afternoon.

LiquaDry was being sued by the estate of Conk under the allegations of being liable for allowing an inexperienced, incompetent, or otherwise unsafe driver to operate a piece of farm machinery, which in turn ended in the unexpected loss of her life.

However, the members of the jury felt the company was not responsible, as the minor defendant’s parents had asked LiquaDry for permission to use the tractor previously. The minor had intensive previous experience in the operation of farm machinery, and incompetency was not a believable factor in the original arrangement.

Due to the nature of the case, the verdict was not limited to “guilty” or “not guilty” options; rather, jury members were instructed to decide if they felt LiquaDry was responsible for Conk’s death, as their piece of farm equipment had been involved.

“Had this case been between two separate individuals, the outcome most likely would have been very different,” a juror said. “But, because of the circumstances and evidence, we felt that LiquaDry simply was not liable. We all took our time and deliberated, and this was what we felt was true.”

“This was a tragedy on both sides,” said Ruth Shapiro, attorney for LiquaDry. “This was not a matter of litigating the automobile accident or the tractor accident, but on whether or not LiquaDry was right to loan the tractor for a community event. The jury did its job, and felt it to be a proper decision.”

Shapiro credits the professionalism of the plaintiff attorneys in aiding the quick resolution of the trial. “This was a well tried case with the upmost professionalism.”

The Chronicle Progress reached out to the plaintiff attorneys but was unable to receive comment.

Roger Clayson Adams

June 4, 1935 ~ September 25, 2016 

Roger Clayson Adams of Fillmore, Ut was born on June 4, 1935 to Neldon and Anne Adams. He passed away peacefully in his sleep September 25, 2016.

Roger is survived by his wife, Suzie, his children, Chris (Theresa), Andrew (Denise), Sarah, Scott (Angie) and Kelli. He is also survived by his sisters, Marlene Whicker and Deaun Bean and his Brother, Paul Adams and his 9 grandkids with one great grandchild on the way.

Roger moved to Fillmore from Springville in 1945. When he entered high school, he started to play the game he loved: Football. He was a key member of the championship teams Millard High School fielded in the 1950’s. He achieved all state status his junior and senior year, and was an All-American tailback his senior year.

Roger married Suzie April 9, 1965 and made Las Vegas their home. They raised 4 kids there and moved back to Fillmore in 1981 where Kelli joined the herd. He spent the rest of his life in Fillmore. Roger enjoyed the outdoors, spending a lot of time in the field hunting and fishing with his sons. He was the best Father and Grandpa any child could ask for. He loved his family dearly and was so proud of his kids and grandchildren.

He is preceded in death by his parents and his sister, Nan Adams Smith.

A viewing will be held at the Fillmore 1st Ward Building from 6-8 Tuesday evening Sept 27. Another viewing will be held from 9:30 to 10:30am on Wednesday Sept 28 and the funeral will be held at 11:00 a.m. Online condolence rasmussenmortuary.com