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Two geology field trips are being offered by the Great Basin College during the Fall Semester.  These are introductory classes with no prerequisites.

Ancient Lake Lahontan (Geol 299) on September 21-24.  2 credits.    Classroom meeting is Thursday at the Winnemucca Great Basin College Campus, Room 122 from 6-9 pm.  Travel on Friday, Saturday and Sunday to examine lake shorelines, tufa formations, hydrologic and volcanic features.  Many stops include the Blackrock Desert, Pyramid Lake, Walker Lake, Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, and the Truckee, Carson, Walker and Humboldt Rivers.  One night will be spent in Winnemucca and two nights in Fallon.

Railroad Valley and the Pancake Range on October 20-22.  1 credit.  Classroom meeting is Friday at the Ely Great Basin College Campus, Room 116 from 6-9 pm.  Travel on Saturday and Sunday to examine lake features, hot and cold springs, and supervolcanoes.  Many stops include the Big Warm Spring, artesian wells, and the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field.  Two nights will be spent in Ely.

 

Participants must be registered and complete required Team Travel and Class Waiver forms one week prior to class.  Travel is at student’s expense.  All maps, charts, and discussions will be provided.  Attendees must provide their own reliable transportation-preferably with four wheel drive.  Camera, binoculars, and other outdoor gear are recommended.

For more information or field trip details call Veronica Nelson, Ely Center Director at 775 289-3589 or course instructor John Breitrick at 775 238-0508.

Great Basin College is a member of the Nevada System of Higher Education and governed by the Board of Regents. The college is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. 

Written by Barbara Clark, staff reporter

The Millard School District voted to increase property taxes by 7.85 percent Wednesday night following a truth-in-taxation hearing where many residents spoke for and against the proposal.

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The newly completed Delta Fire Station hosted their official hose cutting ceremony and open house to the public on Saturday, June 17.

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The event on Fri. and Sat. May 26 and 27. Both days the event will feature Delta’s American Legion Post 135 presenting the colors and Delta resident, Becky Prestwich singing the National Anthem.

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Provides Essential Support Before Disasters Strike

SALT LAKE  CITY April 18, 2014 - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints recently joined a group of elite corporations and organizations as a member of the Annual Disaster Giving Program (ADGP) in support of the American Red Cross. The distinguished members of ADGP enable the Red Cross to respond immediately to the needs of individuals and families impacted by disaster anywhere in the United States, regardless of cost. They do so by helping to build a reliable funding base for disaster relief services.

The generous gift of one million dollars, along with an in-kind donation of $500,000, from the LDS Church, creates the reliable funding needed to deliver swift relief-enabling the Red Cross to respond at a moment’s notice with trained volunteers, supplies from their stocked warehouses, emergency response vehicles and resources, to transform community sites into shelters. The in-kind donations of goods and services empower Red Cross workers to quickly manage and distribute sorely needed relief items and save the organization money by freeing up funds for other critical necessities.

“The generosity of the LDS Church empowers the Red Cross to give hope to people when they need it most. They are truly national leaders in disaster response,” states Heidi Ruster, CEO of the Utah and Nevada Region.

“We have had a great partnership with the American Red Cross for many years and we respect what they do,” said Bruce Muir, LDS Charities director. “The bottom line is, if there’s a fire; they’re there. If there’s a disaster; they’re there. This donation will support their efforts to extend relief to many families and individuals in need.”

The Red Cross and LDS Church have worked together for over 30 years.  This recent partnership will make a lifesaving difference for people affected by devastating events down the street and across the country.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross

“An Evening in Paradise” was the theme for the Miss Hinckley Royalty tryouts held on Saturday in the cultural hall of the Delta West Stake building.

The program started off with introductions of each contestant and an opening dance number. Master of Ceremony Casey Olcott announced the winners after being scored for talent, evening gown and answering questions. The 2017 Miss Hinckley Royalty is Lexi Riding, daughter of Randy and Lesa Riding; first attendant is Maggie Despain, daughter of Deric and Cheryl Despain and second attendant is Julie Brinkerhoff, daughter of Jim and Karen Brinkerhoff. Riding and Despain each danced for their individual talent. Brinkerhoff sang a solo, accompanied by her mother. While the contestants were changing into their gowns, Olcott introduced Holly Joseph, Hinckley town councilmember. Joseph is over the Miss Hinckley Royalty pageant. Also recognized were judges Carol Brinkman, Taylor Peterson and Lorie Bunker. The contestants were judged for evening gown and answer- Miss Hinckley Pioneer Days Royalty chosen Shellie Dutson Publisher ing questions posed to them by Olcott. Riding was asked ‘what is more important, beauty or intelligence?’ She said intelligence was more important because “beauty is a momentary thing while intelligence can last a lifetime.” Despain was asked ‘what qualities did she think a young woman should possess to make a good Miss Hinckley.’ “I think they should have integrity and be honest,” Despain said, “because they are not only representing themselves, they are also representing the town of Hinckley.” Brinkerhoff answered her question, ‘If you could change places with a television character who would it be and why?’ “It would have to be Eponine, from Les Miserables,” said Brinkerhoff, because she is very passionate about what she believes in, and is willing to die for whoever and what she loves.” While the judges were adding up scores, former Miss Hinckley Queens were introduced. They talked about their experiences as royalty for Hinckley and how it had impacted their lives. The 2016 Miss Hinckley, Hannah Clark, told spectators

Understanding the needs of Millard County and the importance of the coal industry highlighted an annual fact-finding tour of southwest Utah with Utah lawmakers last weekend.

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Contact: Veronica Nelson, phone: 289-3589, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   Fax 289-3599

A geology trips is being offered by the Great Basin College during the Spring Semester.  These are introductory classes with no prerequisites.

Topaz Mountain and the West Desert, Utah (Geol 299) on May 5-7 will examine geologic features ofthe West Desert and Ancient Lake Bonneville.  Discussions will focus on the geology of Topaz and other mineral deposits, trilobites volcanoes and ancient Lake Bonneville.  Stops include Crystal Ball Cave, Tule Spring, Sinbad, Topaz Mountain, and the trilobite digs at Antelope Spring.  Classroom meeting is Friday at the Ely Great Basin College Campus, Room 116 from 6-9 pm.  Travel on Saturday and Sunday in Tule Valley, Marjum Canyon, and Topaz Mountain.

 Participants must be registered and complete required Team Travel and Class Waiver forms one week prior to class.  Each field trip is one credit and costs $117.  Travel is at student’s expense.  All maps, charts, and discussions will be provided.  Attendees must provide their own reliable transportation-preferably with four wheel drive.  Camera, binoculars, hand lens and other outdoor gear are recommended.

For more information or field trip details call Veronica Nelson, Ely Center Director at 775 289-3589 or course instructor John Breitrick at 775 238-0508.

Great Basin College is a member of the Nevada System of Higher Education and governed by the Board of Regents. The college is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. 

West Millard recreation hosted a program called Pitch, Hit and Run Saturday morning. Major League Baseball organizes the PHR events which are a free, one-day event for boys and girls ages seven to 14. Participant is able to win their way up to a national level, receiving trophies and prizes.

“It is fun,” said baseball enthusiast, 8-year-old Carver.

Delta held its annual Easter egg hunt in the city park on Saturday. Kids aged 12 and younger raced across the park to find thousands of eggs and treats hidden in the grass. The hunt was over quickly as eggs were scooped up into Easter baskets.

“I came here to get candy. I like candy,” said 5-year-old Angelina.

“I got a lot of candy,” said 5-year-old Jenny.

“Tomorrow is actually Easter, we just came to find candy.” said 7-year-old Brayden.